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The Power Supply Thread

351 posts in this topic

is Antec 80+ Platinum HCP 1000w good enough for 9 hard disk, a GPU radeon hd 7850, i5?

 

That's FAR more power than you need.  650 watts would be plenty.

 

 

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is Antec 80+ Platinum HCP 1000w good enough for 9 hard disk, a GPU radeon hd 7850, i5?

 

That's FAR more power than you need.  650 watts would be plenty.

Newegg specs for that drive says

+12V Rails: 4

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is Antec 80+ Platinum HCP 1000w good enough for 9 hard disk, a GPU radeon hd 7850, i5?

 

That's FAR more power than you need.  650 watts would be plenty.

Newegg specs for that drive says

+12V Rails: 4

4 rails is not a problem in larger power supplies. In this case, it is (4) rails of 40A each. But 1000W is too much for this application.

 

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is Antec 80+ Platinum HCP 1000w good enough for 9 hard disk, a GPU radeon hd 7850, i5?

 

Too much, by a lot. In the platinum class, this wont be a problem. If you already own it, it will be fine.  But if purchasing, a 500W-650W you might save a bit.

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ok cool! I bought it just for the sake of future upgrades. Thanks  a lot!

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According to the second post in this thread, the CORSAIR Builder Series CX430 CMPSU-430CX 430W supports up to 12 green drives. I'm building a system with this PSU for 7-8 green drives.

 

I just realized, though, that the CX430 only has 4 SATA power cables. How do I get power to the other drives? I see online that molex to SATA adapters exist - where would they need to be connected to draw the right amount of power, or does it matter?

 

http://www.corsair.com/~/media/Corsair/download-files/manuals/DC_Cable_consolidation_Rev_28.pdf

 

I'm a relative newbie here - I've built one system (non-unRAID system) before, but I've never run out of power connectors.

 

Here are the details of my build: https://lime-technology.com/forum/index.php?topic=44837.msg428873#msg428873

 

EDIT: With some more research, I think I've answered my own question: Looks like it should be fine with some molex-to-SATA adapters.

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Hi Guys,

 

I have question about power supply in my future build:

 

I3-2100 (65W)

GA-H67N-USB3-B3

2x 8GB Crucial Ballistix 1600mhz

4x Toshiba 3TB DT01ACA300

2x 12cm fan (fan controller at low)

2x SSD 250GB

Nanoxia Deep Silence 4

Seasonic G360 PSU

 

Some parts are already used in 24/7 Windows 7 server, with Virtual Box for LAMP. I want to buy Toshiba hdds and migrate it all to unraid. The questions are:

 

1. Is my Seasonic PSU sufficient for this build? I think that yes, with a lot of headroom, but courius about your opinions.

 

2. Will the 360W Seasonic PSU be sufficient if I switch CPU to i5-3470S (still 65W) and put some low power GPU, only for pass through (e.g. R7 240 30W TDP).

 

I do not plan to use more than 4 HDDs and 2 SSDs.

 

EDIT: No ssds for this build, there are only 4sata ports on the mainboard :)

 

 

 

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Hi there

 

I am trying to replace my current PSU: Coolermaster Silent Pro 600W with something more suited to my new rig.

 

After searching the site I note that Corsair AX Series, Corsair HX750i 80 Plus Platinum 850W Power Supply,

 

EVGA 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply = £99

Corsair CP-9020072-UK Professional Platinum Series HX750i ATX/EPS 750W Power Supply Unit = £119

Corsair Professional Series AX 760 Watt ATX/EPS Fully Modular 80 PLUS Platinum Power Supply = £139

Seasonic P660 660W 80+ Platinum Certified Full Modular Power Supply = £133

 

I am looking to eventually max out the drives and a small passively cooled graphics card to pass through to a windows VM, although not really for gaming.

 

Although I like Corsairs, I am leaning towards the EVGA for its on offer price and 10 year warranty.

 

Would apprecaite some guidance please.

 

Many thanks

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Hi there

 

I am trying to replace my current PSU: Coolermaster Silent Pro 600W with something more suited to my new rig.

 

After searching the site I note that Corsair AX Series, Corsair HX750i 80 Plus Platinum 850W Power Supply,

 

EVGA 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply = £99

Corsair CP-9020072-UK Professional Platinum Series HX750i ATX/EPS 750W Power Supply Unit = £119

Corsair Professional Series AX 760 Watt ATX/EPS Fully Modular 80 PLUS Platinum Power Supply = £139

Seasonic P660 660W 80+ Platinum Certified Full Modular Power Supply = £133

 

I am looking to eventually max out the drives and a small passively cooled graphics card to pass through to a windows VM, although not really for gaming.

 

Although I like Corsairs, I am leaning towards the EVGA for its on offer price and 10 year warranty.

 

Would apprecaite some guidance please.

 

Many thanks

 

I have an EVGA, bought it just to check it out. It's ok, but time will tell. Still in it's first year. Didn't like the bright red cables but no real big deal. Keep in mind, most power supplies do not make their own. They are just slapping labels on it manufactured from another company. EVGA does not make their own.

 

I'm dedicated and will always vouch for Seasonic and have the experience with them. I run lots of Bitcoin miners and I exclusively use only Seasonic power supplies. They do make their own PSU's and use very good quality parts. To this day I've never had one die on me yet and I have over 30 ( possibly 70 at one time) of them running 24/7 all with at least a %60 load. Most of them %80 load. They never complain, shutdown or have fan issues. They just run good.

 

I have had Corsair's in the past and had to trade up all of them with a complaint to Corsair. This was a while ago. Before I knew what I know now. I spent quite a bit of money on a large order of Corsair's, all the same model. Within a year they started to overheat and fail. The fan would be faulty and/or the capacitor's failed. This particular model I had was manufactured by Flextronics ( if memory serves me right ). Long story short Corsair replaced all of the power supplies with a model that I wanted. I found out which models were manufactured by Seasonic and picked one of those. Still running, no problems.

 

Disclaimer: This is not to say there aren't any good PSU's out there that just slap a label on them. This is just my experience since I have quite a few, but do have limit experience on the models out there. I kind of just bought Seasonic/Corsair.

 

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Thanks for the comprehensive response @opentoe

 

In two minds but eventually didn't go for the EVGA as it was only at gold standard whereas the others were at platinum.

 

I did go for the 750i Corsair, which may be a mistake based on your experiences, I am not sure.

 

I've had only a couple of corsairs and they are still going beyond 5years, so hopefully this one is better still.

 

I am also not sure how good seasonics support is in the UK?

 

Anyway, thanks again for your input, much appreciated.

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How can you tell how many rails for the 12V?

I didn't see anything regarding this issue in Corsair's and Seasonic's web sites.

 

Which PS series of these two manufacturers are single 12V rail?

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How can you tell how many rails for the 12V?

I didn't see anything regarding this issue in Corsair's and Seasonic's web sites.

 

Which PS series of these two manufacturers are single 12V rail?

If the ps only states on the side of it or in the specs, 12V then it'll be single rail.  If it states 12v1, 12v2, etc then its dual rail (or more)
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Am i pushing it

 

My setup had the following disc mounted.

 

1 x 3TB WD30EFRX Red (Parity)

2 x 2TB WD20EARX Caviar green

2 x 2TB WD20EARS Caviar green

1 x 2TB WD20EACS Caviar green

2 x 2TB ST2000DM001 Seagate (7200)

 

Some new hardware have been added.

 

4 x 3TB DT01ACA300 Toshiba (7200) (at this moment only 2 discs have been added to the array)

Drive Cage: Raidsonic IB-544SKK

SATA Expansion Card: Adaptec RAID 1430SA & LyCOM PE-120

 

I'm using a Corsair CX600 V2 PSU

 

My question now is, can the PSU handle all this extra hardware?

 

Have the feeling that some of the green drives may be ripe for change in the near future.

 

And if i don't wish to limit myself to green/blue drives, then i may be short of power.

 

If i really am pushing it, what would be a good PSU for me?

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------

OS: 5.0-rc16c

CPU: Celeron G1610 2 MB (BX80637G1610)

MOBO: Asrock B75 Pro3-M (firmware 1.80)

RAM: Kingston ValueRAM 2 x 4 GB 1600mhz (KVR16N11S8K2/8)

Case: Enermax Ostrog GT (ECA3280A-B-F)

Drive Cage: Raidsonic IB-544SKK

PSU: Corsair CX600 V2

SATA Expansion Card: Adaptec RAID 1430SA & LyCOM PE-120

USB key: Sandisk Cruzer Fit 4GB (pro licence ordered 18. august 2013)

Fans: The 3 fans that were included in the case.

Sata power splitter: Silverstone CP06

Sata data: sata 600 0,5m

 

Primary Use: Media (movies, tvseries, backup)

 

 

 

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Hi...as per my knowledge Modular PSUs allow you to use only the cables you need, and remove the rest.  This reduces cable clutter and can benefit airflow through the case.  Some companies that sell modular PSUs will also sell or give you extra cables of certain types.  This can be especially beneficial in the case of unRAID servers, as servers generally need a lot of one type of power connection.  These extra cables can reduce or negate your need for power splitters.

 

pcb assembly manufacturer

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These extra cables can reduce or negate your need for power splitters.
But modular cables introduce another slip fit mechanical connection at the point they plug in to the PSU, effectively negating the advantage of not using splitters. Permanent solder joints are a much better idea reliability wise.
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These extra cables can reduce or negate your need for power splitters.
But modular cables introduce another slip fit mechanical connection at the point they plug in to the PSU, effectively negating the advantage of not using splitters. Permanent solder joints are a much better idea reliability wise.

Agree on the permanent solder joints, but I have yet to see a modular cable connector that didn't make a better connection than a molex splitter.
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These extra cables can reduce or negate your need for power splitters.
But modular cables introduce another slip fit mechanical connection at the point they plug in to the PSU, effectively negating the advantage of not using splitters. Permanent solder joints are a much better idea reliability wise.

Agree on the permanent solder joints, but I have yet to see a modular cable connector that didn't make a better connection than a molex splitter.

Stop using poorly made molex splitters?  ;D

 

Seriously, there sometimes is a huge quality difference between branded and generic stuff when it comes to connectors. Different alloys, tighter tolerances, better coatings, all the qualities that matter when you have a slip fit spring connection. Visually it may not be much different, but it sure makes a difference after they've been in service a few years.

 

 

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I'm finally close to upgrading my unRAID setup to a Supermicro X10SDV-TLN4F with 32GB ECC RAM. The board is limited to 6 SATA slots, so I'm planning on getting a Perc H310 controller, and in total using 7 hard disks and 1 or 2 SSDs. No GPU (no spare slot anyway, after the Perc).

 

I'm guessing a 450W PSU would be enough? Unfortunately I'm not in the USA and I can't get many 450W PSUs that are Gold rated. I'm looking at a Seasonic G-450 (5 year warranty) or Corsair RM650i (10 year warranty). Although 650W is probably much more than I need, unfortunately the only bad PSU I've had to replace was the most expensive one I've bought so far, a Seasonic X-Series, so I'm tempted to look at another brand. Yes, I'm probably just unfortunate, but still...

 

Any suggestions/comments would be appreciated.

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In the end I went with a Corsair RM650X. One thing that I hadn't thought about was the number of SATA connectors that provided on the cables. There are 3 cables x 3 connectors, so I'm just OK for 5 data disks, 2 parity and in future 2 SSDs for cache/VM.

 

But because of cable routing, it would have been nice to have another cable for more flexibility. I could do something with splitters or molex-to-SATA connectors, but the tidier solution would have been another SATA power cable. I was tempted to grab one of many (unlabelled) old cables from old PSUs that all seem pretty similar, but fortunately I read the thread here: http://lime-technology.com/forum/index.php?topic=53341.0.

 

Looking back, I realise now that smaller PSUs may well be more efficient (in terms of power provided to power needed), but they often come with fewer SATA connectors. How do other users connect their drives to the PSUs once they exceed the connectors provided with the PSU cables? I've read reports of poor quality splitters - are there any recommended brands?

 

 

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the tidier solution

...is definitely the use of this kind of cables.

CABLE-COLDPLUG-SAS-34036285-T26139-Y4023-V501

 

Unfortunately it's hard to find them, especially for a reasonable price.

 

There is also a similar build from DELL.

sas-sata-cable-assembly-233td-0233td

 

No issue with splitters.

Nice and tight fit of both, the SATA and the power cable, on the drive.

Only the price is an issue. Got some of the DELL cables from the china guy through ebay but you have to

take care, by default he charges for express shipping (per cable)!

 

Next thing you can do to avoid splitters is adding some SATA connectors on that cables.

I did this because I found the gap between two connectors was too big and there was too much

cabling mess. So I removed the connectors from some spare cables I had (looked pretty much like those on

above site) and crimped them between two existing connectors.

 

 

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I know this is a long shot Anyone have any suggestions on a quietish 1u psu?

My case currently has Emacs 460w psu which came with, and on it own sounds like a jet taking off

And a ton of cables i have no need for.

 

I need it to power the folowing

 

Asrock avoton itx board

Perc 310 card

12x 3.5 hdds

2x ssds

And about 10 fans for cooling

 

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I know this is a long shot Anyone have any suggestions on a quietish 1u psu?

My case currently has Emacs 460w psu which came with, and on it own sounds like a jet taking off

And a ton of cables i have no need for.

 

I need it to power the folowing

 

Asrock avoton itx board

Perc 310 card

12x 3.5 hdds

2x ssds

And about 10 fans for cooling

 

Any 1U supply is going to have relatively noisy fans due to their small size (and thus high RPM needed to move a good volume of air).    The following unit has a thermally controlled set of dual fans, so will most likely be fairly quiet most of the time, since your system will typically use a very low % of the power supply's capacity.    Unfortunately the manufacturer doesn't provide any noise level specifications, so it's impossible to know the actual level without simply trying it.

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA00Y42U9499

 

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I currently have a Corsair CS-M 550W PSU.  I've heard many mixed reviews on this lower end model of Corsair.  When I originally bought it, the system it was for I never expected to run more than 2 (max 3) HDs, and pretty low-end components besides that.  I have got it for a Dell Poweredge T20 that I got at a very low price from Dell.  Since I haven't used the system in the ~6 months Ive had it, and was in the market for a NAS, I have decided to turn it into one.  Planning on having 8 x 3.5" HDs (Currently have 2 x 2TB WD blue, and 2 x 3TB WD red, and the stock 1 TB hitachi, as well as a 750gb Crucial SSD).  Also have a ATI Radeon Firepro w4100 (Not sure if this card will be of any use on an unraid server, but I will find out soon enough), a wifi card (this may be getting removed), and just ordered a Dell H310 Perc card to support the additional HDs.

 

Anyway, the last thing I want is to have a lo-quality PSU start damaging my components.  If I had known I was gonna turn this computer into an unRaid/NAS, with all these HDs, I likely would have gotten a Seasonic in the first place (always had good luck with them)... but now I'm on the edge of whether I should upgrade, or if the Corsair CS-M is solid enough to not worry.

 

My current upgrades and planned ones I summarized in this thread 

 

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